Sick from stress? Blame your Mom, and epigenetics

| August 3, 2012
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

If you’re sick from stress, a new research report appearing in the August 2012 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that what your mother ate — or didn’t eat — may be part of the cause. The report shows that choline intake that is higher than what is generally recommended during pregnancy may improve how a child responds to stress. These improvements are the result of epigenetic changes that ultimately lead to lower cortisol levels. Epigenetic changes affect how a gene functions, even if the gene itself is not changed. Lowering cortisol is important as high levels of cortisol are linked to a wide range of problems ranging from mental health to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.

View the original article here: Sick from Stress? Blame Your Mom… And Epigenetics – Science Daily (press release)

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