How genetic plunder transformed a microbe into a pink, salt-loving scavenger

The following is an excerpt.

Most cells would shrivel to death in a salt lake. But not the Halobacteria. These microbes thrive in brine, painting waters a gentle pink or crimson red wherever they bloom. The Halobacteria live in every salt lake on this planet, from the Dead Sea of Israel to the vast salt flats at the feet of the Sierra Nevada.

Microbiologists have long noted something odd about the Halobacteria. In all their evolutionary analyses, they found that Halobacteria are part of a branch of archaea called the ‘methanogens’. What bothers microbiologists is that as microbes, methanogens and Halobacteria couldn’t be more different.

Two types of microbes with radically different life strategies, yet one evolved from the other. So how did the Halobacteria cross the line?

Shijulal Nelson-Sathi thinks he has found the answer. In their latest paper, he and his colleagues show that the ancestor of all Halobacteria acquired as much as a thousand genes from another microbe, a bacterium. And through this act of plunder, the microbiologists write, the Halobacteria left their methanogenic ways behind, becoming salt-loving scavengers in the process.

View the original article here: How genetic plunder transformed a microbe into a pink, salt-loving scavenger

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