Neuroscientist has the genes of a psychopath but an otherwise normal life

One afternoon in October 2005, neuroscientist James Fallon was looking at brain scans of serial killers.

“I got to the bottom of the stack, and saw this scan that was obviously pathological,” he said. When he looked up the code, he was greeted by an unsettling revelation: the psychopathic brain pictured in the scan was his own.

When he underwent a series of genetic tests, he got more bad news. “I had all these high-risk alleles for aggression, violence and low empathy,” he says. Eventually, based on further neurological and behavioral research into psychopathy, he decided he was indeed a psychopath—just a relatively good kind.

Read the full, original story here: The neuroscientist who discovered he was a psychopath

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