Switching genes on and off can change fate, theoretically anyhow

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A Chennai-based researcher is part of team that has provided proof of the concept that turning on and turning off genes — a process if validated in therapeutics — will be “fate-changing.”

Ganesh N. Pandian lived nearly all his life in Chennai, and went to D.G. Vaishnav college and IIT, Madras, before he went to the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Japan, for his PhD. But he stayed on to do more than that, landing himself in the middle of a game-changer project.

“We are trying to give silent genes a voice by turning them on. We are working on the premise that by re-programming or resetting cells, it might be possible to cure disease,” he says.

Read the full, original story: Turning genes on and off can be fate-changing, says researcher

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