Proteins could keep gut cells alive after chemotherapy or radiation attack

A protein that keeps gut cells alive could be key to surviving acute radiation syndrome. Tests in mice of a therapy that shores up levels of the protein in cells indicate that it limits the intestinal damage caused by exposure to radiation — such as could occur during a ‘dirty bomb’ attack. The drug could also prove useful for counteracting the side-effects of cancer radiation therapy.

Drugs are already available to treat the bone-marrow damage that occurs in acute radiation syndrome. But no good drugs are available to counter the fatal gastrointestinal damage that often accompanies it, which is marked by dehydration, malnutrition and infection.

Read the full, original story: Wanted: cure for fatal effects of radiation

Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
GLP Podcasts
Infographic: Here’s where GM crops are grown around the world today

Infographic: Here’s where GM crops are grown around the world today

Do you know where biotech crops are grown in the world? This updated ISAAA infographics show where biotech crops were ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
Send this to a friend