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Adult insomnia is genetic, and affects women more than men

| September 17, 2015

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. 

A new study of twins suggests that insomnia in adults is partially explained by genetic factors, and this heritability is higher in females than in males.

Results show that the genetic influences on insomnia symptoms in adults were substantial and largely stable over time while differing significantly by sex. In the longitudinal model, the estimated heritability of insomnia was 59 percent for females and 38 percent for males.

“This study indicates that genes may play a larger role in the development of insomnia symptoms for women than for men, providing some of the first formal evidence for sex differences in an adult sample,” said first author Mackenzie Lind, a doctoral candidate at the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. “Given the evidence for sex differences, it may be useful to specifically target females for sleep interventions.”

Read full, original post: Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in adults

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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