The GLP is committed to full transparency. Download and review our 2019 Annual Report

How Monsanto, one of the world’s most vilified companies, could be crucial in feeding it

| | June 7, 2016

This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis.

. . . Is it conceivable that the planet’s most vilified company could be the one that feeds it?

That. . . is precisely what Monsanto hopes it can do. . . .

The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that we must double the current level of food production . . . by 2050. . . using fewer resources. And we’ll have to do it as climate change rewrites the weather rules. . . .

. . . .

. . . “Twenty years ago,” [CEO Hugh Grant] says, “we thought biotech was going to be the panacea.” In the past half-decade the company has begun to look beyond seed for answers. . .  In 2013 it bought weather-data startup ­Climate Corp. . . it partnered with Danish company Novozymes, hoping to find ways to boost crop yields by harnessing plant microbiomes. . . .

. . . .The company that was founded in 1901 as a chemical maker, then turned itself into a biotech company, and finally became a seed company is metamorphosing anew: this time, into a data company. . . .

Erik Andrejko, who runs Monsanto’s data science center, frames the company’s new mission more succinctly: “Feeding the world through math.”

Read full, original post: Can Monsanto Save the Planet?

News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
Optional. Mail on special occasions.

Send this to a friend