New design allows for portable DNA sequencing biosensors for enhanced disease detection

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An all-UC San Diego team is reporting that it has found out how to more accurately detect single-nucleotide variations in DNA using nanoelectronics. If the study is confirmed, it could lead to more reliable DNA-based diagnostics, such as miniaturized, implantable sequencing biosensors.

Authors led by Ratnesh Lal and Gennadi Glinsky say the new technology is well-suited to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms. These one-letter changes in sequence can cause diseases such as sickle-cell anemia and cystic fibrosis.

“The major difference between our design and the current systems is that we don’t use optical detection, only electrical detection,” they said. “This allows it to be portable.”

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The researchers said the team isn’t developing its method for whole-genome sequencing now, but it is highly feasible to rapidly advance technology in this direction in the near future.

“The most exciting news is that advancement of this technology to wireless and implantable nano-chip architecture represents the realistic next steps which would facilitate its rapid introduction into variety of clinical settings to enable an entirely new of way of conducting blood-based laboratory tests.”

Read full, original post: DNA sequencing miniaturized

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