Spraying of not-yet-approved dicamba resistant soy killing some crops

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Dicamba . . . vaporizes quickly and blows with the wind. And it’s especially toxic to soybeans. . .

Damage from drifting pesticides isn’t unfamiliar to farmers. But . . . this year’s plague of dicamba damage is unprecedented. “I’ve never seen anything like this before,” says Bob Scott, a weed specialist. . . “This is a unique situation that Monsanto created.”

. . . Monsanto . . . launched. . . an updated version of its herbicide-tolerant soybean seeds. This new version, which Monsanto calls “Xtend,” isn’t just engineered to tolerate sprays of glyphosate. . . It’s also immune to dicamba.

[But]. . . . The EPA has not yet approved the new dicamba weedkiller . . . That new formulation of dicamba. . . won’t vaporize as easily, and won’t be as likely to harm neighboring crops. . . .

But, Monsanto went ahead and started selling its dicamba-resistant soybeans before this herbicide was approved. . . .

Monsanto says it did so because these seeds . . . also offered higher yields . . . .

. . . Robert Goodson, an agricultural extension agent . . . believes that some farmers were hoping that the EPA would approve the new dicamba weedkiller in the course of the growing season. . . Or maybe some farmers secretly intended to violate the law, using regular old dicamba. . .

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Crime In The Fields: How Monsanto And Scofflaw Farmers Hurt Soybeans In Arkansas