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India’s intellectual property rights battle with Monsanto could cripple innovation

| | August 31, 2016

Unfortunately, in its campaign to lessen farmers’ reliance on Monsanto seeds, the [Indian] government has chosen to use the bluntest of instruments: bullying and expropriation. . .  [I]t’s decided to cap the royalty payments that Indian seed companies pay Monsanto for the use of its technology. . . .

Worse. . . the government declared cotton seeds an “essential commodity.” This brought into force the draconian provisions of a socialist-era price control law. . .

Worst of all, . . . a new licensing framework . . .  allows the government to decide at any point that domestic seed companies no longer need to pay the intellectual property owner anything. . . .

None of this is likely to improve the lives of Indian farmers. . . . the seeds they buy aren’t noticeably cheaper. Instead the policy benefits India’s politically powerful domestic seed companies. . . .

The dangers of the government’s strategy are obvious. . . .

. . . . The Indian government appears intent on taking technology from a foreign company and passing it on to domestic firms. . . .

. . . .What’s happened to Monsanto could happen to any foreign company and any innovator. Once that realization sinks in, India will pay the heavier price.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: India’s Monsanto clash is bad news for innovators

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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