Scientist create first map of gene interactions in cells

| | September 27, 2016
This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

Researchers at the University of Toronto…have created the first map that shows the global genetic interaction network of a cell. It begins to explain how thousands of genes coordinate with one another to orchestrate cellular life.

The study was led by U of T Professors Brenda Andrews and Charles Boone, and Professor Chad Myers of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. It opens the door to a new way of exploring how genes contribute to disease with a potential for developing finely-tuned therapies.

“We’ve created a reference guide for how to chart genetic interactions in a cell,” said Michael Costanzo, a research associate in the Boone lab…”We can now tell what kind of properties to look for in searching for highly connected genes in human genetic networks with the potential to impact genetic diseases.”

[T]he genes in cells operate in hierarchical networks to organize cellular life. Researchers believe that if we are to understand what 20,000 human genes do, we must first find out how they are connected to each other.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Landmark map reveals the genetic wiring of cellular life

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