Artificial Intelligence: Can robot doctors determine the right gene-linked drugs?

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Using a computational platform and your DNA, bioinformatics startup InsideDNA aims to determine the right drug interaction for your body.

It works by using data to look for an association between genes and diseases and then checking if proteins produced by those genes associated with a disease are suitable drug targets.

The combination of artificial intelligence, supercomputers, and drug discovery is a growing field in medicine — and some fear a computer could one day replace doctors. For example, IBM’s Watson, a powerful cognitive computer that beat humans to become the Jeopardy world champion, was able to accurately determine the ailment of a Japanese woman in 10 minutes after years of misdiagnoses from human doctors.

The bigger concern isn’t whether we’re getting robot doctors in the future, but privacy concerns. Patients need to voluntarily offer their DNA data. However, accurate diagnoses would rely on a vast and diverse repository of genetic information.

Right now InsideDNA says its biggest challenge isn’t privacy, but establishing credibility in the biopharma world.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: InsideDNA looks deep into DNA to find the best drug targets

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