US withdrawal from Trans Pacific Partnership worries nation’s cattle producers

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On [January 23], he signs [a Presidential memorandum that withdraws] the U.S. from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. What’s more, he has the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) lined up in his crosshairs. The honeymoon with many in agriculture was over before it ever really began, it appears. And many in ag don’t like it.

One of them is Tracy Brunner, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA):

Fact is American cattle producers are already losing out on $400,000 in sales every day because we don’t have TPP, and since NAFTA was implemented, exports of American-produced beef to Mexico have grown by more than 750%. We’re especially concerned that the Administration is taking these actions without any meaningful alternatives in place that would compensate for the tremendous loss that cattle producers will face without TPP or NAFTA.

Likewise, Phil Seng, CEO of the U.S. Meat Export Federation, says that “USMEF remains fully committed to our valued trading partners in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). These countries account for more than 60% of U.S. red meat exports.”

Seng says in some of these key markets, the U.S. red meat industry will remain at a serious competitive disadvantage unless meaningful market access gains are realized.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Trump’s honeymoon already over for ag, it appears

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