China’s slowdown in approval of GMO imports harming US farmers

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Brazil soy cultivation

U.S. officials have prodded China repeatedly for a faster and more open system for deciding whether to approve the import of new GMO crop varieties. China approved only one strain last year, a soybean strain from Bayer’s Crop Science division, compared with three varieties approved in 2015.

The courts are still cleaning up the mess from Chinese rejection in 2013 of cargoes of U.S. corn on the grounds the U.S. included an unapproved GMO variety (MIR162) from Syngenta. U.S. regulators approved the strain in 2010.

The American Chamber of Commerce says it typically takes six years to win Chinese clearance of a GMO variety, twice as long as other major nations. Government decisions on approval of biotech applications are made once a year. The panel of experts who review applications used to meet three times a year, but now they are required to meet at least twice a year.

U.S. ag exports to China increased by 125% in the past decade, as Beijing became the largest U.S. customer for farm products, says USDA Chief Economist Robert Johansson.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: CHINA SLOWS DOWN APPROVAL OF GMO VARIETIES

For more background on the Genetic Literacy Project, read GLP on Wikipedia

Outbreak Featured
Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

Infographic: Growing human embryos — How long should researchers watch human development play out in a dish?

In May, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) released new guidelines that relaxed the 14-day rule, taking away ...
Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.