GMO debate intensifies as Ghana prepares for first crop release in 2018

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BT Cowpea will be Ghana's first commercially-available GMO crop

The debate over whether biotechnology applications are safe in food production has intensified in Ghana as the country prepares for its first commercial release of a genetically engineered (GE) crop in 2018.

The anti-GMO campaigning group Food Sovereignty Ghana responded with a strongly worded statement to the press, describing the declaration of support by the [National Seed Trade Association of Ghana (NASTAG)] as unfortunate. “Our simple response is that the concerns about GMOs are widespread and totally reasonable given the overwhelming quantum of independent research findings which question their safety for human health and expose their negative effects on the environment. Furthermore, Mr. Havor’s assurances of the safety of GMOs run counter to the peer-reviewed publication in the European Network of Scientists for Social and Environmental Responsibilities, involving scientists, physicians, academics…” the group said. “We strongly reject claims by GM seed developers and some scientists, commentators, and journalists that there is a ‘scientific consensus’ on GMO safety…”

Despite the group’s contention to the contrary, a wide range of credible scientific organizations, most notably the prestigious National Academies of Science, has determined that GMO crops are just as safe as their non-GMO counterparts.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion and analysis. Read full, original post: Ghana GMO debate intensifies ahead of first biotech crop release