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Cost of pet cloning is dropping: Should you do it?

After photographer Monni Must’s 28-year-old daughter Miya committed suicide…the grieving mother adopted Miya’s spunky black Labrador, Billy Bean.

Last year, as the 10th anniversary of her daughter’s death approached, the dog was nearing 13 and becoming increasingly frail.

So she decided to clone her.

She paid more than $50,000 for what is essentially an identical twin of Billy, born at a later date.

Companies that clone animals are “preying on grieving pet owners, giving them a false promise that they are going to replicate their beloved pet,” [Humane Society program manager Viki Katrinak] told AFP. “Pet cloning doesn’t replicate a pet’s personality,” she said.

[T]he veterinarian takes a tissue biopsy, a chunk of skin and muscle about the size of a pencil eraser. The next step is to take an egg cell from a donor dog, remove the egg’s nucleus, and insert DNA from the pet to be cloned. When an embryo develops, it is transplanted in the womb of a surrogate dog.

Traits that will carry over can include temperament, physical characteristics and genetic flaws. Coat patterns may differ, and the cloned animal will have no awareness of the life its predecessor lived.

According to Must, the puppy that was cloned from Billy is playful and fearless, like her. They also share the same petite frame, shiny coat and big paws.

Read full, original post: Pet cloning is not just for celebrities anymore

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