South African scientist: GMO crops can improve crop nutrients, boost Africa’s agricultural productivity

gm maize zimbabwe
[Jennifer Thomson from South Africa’s University of Cape Town] has been a strong advocate of promoting modern biotechnology in Africa for its potential in helping the continent overcome hunger and poverty. The first woman to head a department in the Science Faculty at the University of Cape Town, she has written a number of peer-reviewed papers and authored books about genetically modified (GM) crops. Jennifer is also a well-known speaker about GM crops and has addressed the World Economic Forum in Davos twice and the United Nations as guest of then Secretary General Kofi Annan. Her three books, Genes for AfricaSeeds for the Future, and Food for Africa are bestsellers and written with the layperson in mind.

What is your vision for Africa’s agricultural productivity?

Thomson: The use of every modern tool that can improve both productivity and nutrient value. If that involves genetically modified crops, indigenous knowledge, artificial intelligence, better use of grey water – no matter – go for what works best. But make sure that technology serves the people, not the other way round.

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Read full, original post: 5 Questions with Jennifer Thomson, Microbiologist, President of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World, and The World Academy of Science Fellow

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