Viewpoint: Science hype doomed startup that promised to upload brains ‘to the cloud’

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This past March, headlines suddenly flooded the Internet about a startup company called Nectome. Founded by two graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the new company was charging people $10,000 to join a waiting list to have their brains embalmed, down to the last neuron, using an award-winning chemical compound.

Almost immediately this story gained buzz with punchy headlines: “Startup wants to upload your brain to the cloud, but has to kill you to do it,” “San Junipero is real: Nectome wants to upload your brain,” and “New tech firm promises eternal life, but you have to die.”

How media coverage of Nectome went from an initial fastidiously researched article in the MIT Technology Review by veteran science journalist Antonio Regalado to the click-bait frenzy it became is a prime example of the ‘science hype’ phenomenon.

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In this case, a combination of the hyperbolic press, combined with some impressively researched expose pieces, led MIT to cut its ties with Nectome on April 2nd, 2018, just two weeks after the news of their company broke.

Because of its multi-layered nature, science hype carries several disturbing consequences. For one, exaggerated coverage of a discovery could mislead the public by giving them false hope or unfounded worry. And media hype can contribute to a general mistrust of science.

Read full, original post: The Dangers of Hype: How a Bold Claim and Sensational Media Unraveled a Company

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