Viewpoint: Despite what you might hear, there’s still no evidence linking cell phones to cancer

wireless cell phone
Image credit: CFO
[Recently] the Observer published an article by Mark Hertsgaard and Mark Dowie on a disturbing topic – the idea that telecoms giants might collude to suppress evidence that wireless technology causes cancer.

Yet as enthralling as Hertsgaard and Dowie’s narrative might be, it is strewn with rudimentary errors and dubious inferences. As a physicist working in cancer research, I found the authors’ penchant for amplifying claims far beyond that which the evidence allows troubling.

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[A] multitude of studies have been performed to this end, and as the World Health Organisation states, there has been no evidence of detrimental health effects: “A large number of studies have been performed over the last two decades to assess whether mobile phones pose a potential health risk. To date, no adverse health effects have been established as being caused by mobile phone use.”

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The authors conclude by stating a “lack of definitive proof that a technology is harmful does not mean the technology is safe”

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The onus here is on the authors to prove their assertion – it is sheer logical contortion to present a lack of evidence as a superficial supporting argument.

[C]urrent evidence contradicts the hypothesis that mobile phones increase the risk of cancer. Scaremongering narratives may be more alluring than the less sensational, scientific findings, but they are not harmless.

Read full, original post: Mobile phones and cancer – the full picture

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