Caster Semenya testosterone ruling to be appealed by South African government

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Caster Semenya
Caster Semenya. Image: SportsNet

South Africa’s track federation will appeal against the recent Caster Semenya ruling, the country’s sports ministry has confirmed.

The government ministry said two of the three judges who heard the case at the court of arbitration for sport were “conflicted,” they claim facts were ignored and that the track and field’s governing body was given “unfettered latitude” to do as it pleases.

Athletics South Africa (ASA), the governing body of track and field in the country, was one of two parties alongside Semenya to take the International Association of Athletics Federations to court to challenge its testosterone regulations in competitions for women.

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The IAAF won the case and last week rules came into effect requiring the South African 800m Olympics champion and other female athletes with “differences of sex development” conditions and high levels of natural testosterone to medically lower them to be eligible to compete in events from 400m to a mile.

ASA and Semenya could have a case if Cas judges ignored strong scientific evidence disputing how much advantage the South African runner gets from her high natural testosterone. The IAAF’s data has been criticised as flawed by some scientists.

Read full, original post: Athletics South Africa to appeal against Caster Semenya ruling

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