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Sickle cell patient first to receive experimental CRISPR treatment in the US for a genetic disorder

| | August 5, 2019

For the first time, doctors in the U.S. have used the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR to try to treat a patient with a genetic disorder.

“It is just amazing how far things have come,” says Victoria Gray, 34, of Forest, Miss. “It is wonderful,” she told NPR in an exclusive interview after undergoing the landmark treatment for sickle cell disease.

Gray is the first patient ever to be publicly identified as being involved in a study testing the use of CRISPR for a genetic disease.

But it probably will take months, if not years, of careful monitoring of Gray and other patients before doctors know whether the treatment is safe and how well it might be helping patients.

For the study, doctors are using cells taken from patients’ own bone marrow that have been genetically modified with CRISPR to make them produce a protein that is usually only made by fetuses and by babies for a short time following birth.

The hope is this protein will compensate for the defective protein that causes sickle cell disease and will enable patients to live normally for the rest of their lives.

Read full, original post: In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

Related article:  CRISPR's challenge: It's still easier to subtract genes than it is to add them
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