Podcast: Will gene editing’s potential be realized in agriculture? GLP’s Jon Entine and Innovation Forum’s Toby Webb talk about the future of genetic modification

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Jon Entine (left) and Toby Webb.
Jon Entine (left) and Toby Webb.

unnamedThe Genetic Literacy Project’s Jon Entine and Innovation Forum’s Toby Webb talk about why gene editing has yet to make significant impact in the agriculture sector.

Entine explains how gene editing mimics what happens in nature, enhancing qualities and eliminating problems.

They discuss the differences between gene editing and genetic modification, and why the former should not be bundled together with the latter as regulators and brands catch up with the potential of science.

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Jon Entine is the founding editor of the Genetic Literacy Project, and winner of 19 major journalism awards. He has written two best-sellers, Taboo: Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports and Why We’re Afraid to Talk About It, and Abraham’s Children: Race, Genetics, and the DNA of The Chosen People. You can follow him on Twitter @JonEntine

Related article:  Environmental media, advocacy groups in uproar after EPA grants long-term approval for alleged 'bee-killing' pesticide sulfoxaflor. Here's what the science says

Toby Webb is the founder of Innovation Forum, which focuses on analysis and convening meetings on the most difficult questions facing large companies. Toby also teaches Corporate Responsibility & Sustainability at Birkbeck College, University of London and King’s College London. He is now a visiting lecturer at Kings on corporate sustainability, supply chains and innovation. Find Toby on Twitter @webb_tobias

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