Viewpoint: Neuriva Plus nonsense — The Big Bang Theory star Mayim Bialik doubles down on ‘snake oil’ brain supplements

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Mayim Bialik. Credit: Neuriva
Mayim Bialik. Credit: Neuriva

I wrote about the brain supplement Neuriva over a year ago. I thought their claim to have proof from clinical studies was misleading… An article in Psychology Today reviewed the evidence and called it “Neuriva nonsense” and “just another snake oil.”

Now they are selling Neuriva Plus, which combines the ingredients in the original Neuriva with vitamins B6, B12, and folate. Do they have any evidence that adding these vitamins enhances the effectiveness of Neuriva? Of course not! Neither Neuriva nor Neuriva Plus has been clinically tested. They are relying on studies of individual ingredients, and those studies are questionable. 

Now Mayim Bialik has embarked on a campaign as Neuriva’s science ambassador. You may have seen her commercials on TV where she says she “loves the science of Neuriva” and claims it supports six key indicators of brain health. You may remember her as Amy Farrah Fowler, Sheldon’s girlfriend in The Big Bang TV series.

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She holds a PhD in neuroscience, but I couldn’t find whether she ever actually worked as a neuroscientist. It’s obvious that her understanding of “strong science” doesn’t mean what she thinks it means.

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