Science is revolutionizing how elite female athletes train. What we’ve learned could benefit all women

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Credit: Hawaii Pacific Health
Credit: Hawaii Pacific Health

When Dr. Kate Ackerman was in medical school 20 years ago, she’d heard of the term “female athlete triad.” Coined in 1997 by the American College of Sports Medicine, it described the constellation of three disorders — amenorrhea (a lack of menstrual periods), bone-thinning osteoporosis and disordered eating — that is sometimes seen among women athletes. It’s triggered by extreme exercise and low body weight. But other than that descriptive term, Ackerman says, not much sports science research had been published about female athletes. 

Thanks to Ackerman’s research… the female athlete triad is now often more broadly known as relative energy deficiency in sport, or RED-S — essentially, a problem of athletes underfueling…. RED-S can also include depression, impaired cardiovascular and immune function. The physical strain can negatively affect athletic performance.

Follow the latest news and policy debates on agricultural biotech and biomedicine? Subscribe to our newsletter.

“We are applying so much information to women that is based on men,” Ackerman says, “that once we start doing these studies in women that are specifically for women and having results that we can then apply to women’s training, I’m anticipating that we will see huge improvements in performance. We have not even begun to tap the potential of female athletes.”

Read the original post

Related article:  COVID and the Amish: Ohio congregants face soaring infectections and vaccination rate is only 1%. Here’s why
Outbreak Featured
Infographic: Autoimmune diseases — 76 identified so far — tend to target women over men. Here is a master list

Infographic: Autoimmune diseases — 76 identified so far — tend to target women over men. Here is a master list

There are many autoimmune diseases, and taken together they affect as much as 4.5 percent of the world’s population. This ...
Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.