Viewpoint: World’s ‘well, wealthy and worried’ deny the science behind GMOs. Here’s why their opposition is so dangerous

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Credit: Isaac Arjonilla/Orange County Register
Credit: Isaac Arjonilla/Orange County Register

The Well, the Wealthy, and the Worried are the folks who think they can afford to overlook the incredible benefits of GMOs. They are already healthy (or assume they are), possess enough money that they don’t have to fuss over the cost of food, and rarely know much about scientific evidence.

Yet the W.W.W.s are wrong and their ignorance hurts others.

GMOs can deliver wellness. It may come in the form of purple tomatoes that improve nutrition, or in the form of golden rice, which supplies additional vitamin A.

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GMOs aren’t for the wealthy: They are essential to abundant production and help keep food prices low. Most of the world’s GMO growers are smallholder farmers in the developing world. They may be poor, but GMOs are helping them climb out of poverty.

GMOs are no cause for worry. They’ve received more scientific scrutiny than any product that finds its way onto dinner plates around the world. Following decades of research, there is no evidence that GMOs cause harm. They are not risky to eat. What we’re finding, in fact, is the reverse: They represent a tremendous potential to improve human health.

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