Viewpoint: Ivermectin dewormer folly — How the right fell in love with the latest bogus COVID cure

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Credit: Benoit Tessier/Reuters
Credit: Benoit Tessier/Reuters

For much of the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, President Donald Trump and his allies pushed an unproven drug, hydroxychloroquine, as a potential wonder drug to defeat the virus. It never panned out.

But many of the same people and organizations were apparently unchastened by that experience. Slowly over the past nine months, they have injected another supposed potential wonder drug into the political bloodstream: ivermectin.

Months later, there is still no good evidence to back them up. And it has culminated in the Food and Drug Administration warning people who are apparently desperate (but for some reason are unwilling to get a much-more tested vaccine) against buying a version of the drug meant for deworming livestock, after people did just that.

Not that any of ivermectin’s adherents will be convinced by that. It’s all, apparently, part of the conspiracy.

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[Fox News host Laura] Ingraham floated a conspiracy theory that rears its head to this day: the idea that drugs like ivermectin are being suppressed as coronavirus treatments because they are too cheap — or even that they would jeopardize the emergency approvals of the vaccines.

Related article:  Under what legal conditions can governments and businesses mandate vaccines?

This is an excerpt. Read the original post here.

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