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‘Family duty’ could explain why so many Chinese couples signed up for controversial ‘CRISPR baby’ experiment

Young adults in China feel a powerful cultural obligation to marry and have kids, but that life plan suddenly looks ...
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Controversial Chinese gene-editing scientist downplays reports suggesting he could face death penalty

The Chinese scientist who shocked the world in November by announcing that twin girls had been born from embryos that he had created ...
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After dodging a ban, what’s in store for gene drives in 2019?

With gene drive techniques, we could—perhaps rapidly and inexpensively—wipe out malaria’s hosts for good, and consign it to the list ...
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Fears of gene editing in the US could be stoked by Russian disinformation attacks

[There’s a] risk to gene drive research that has flown under the radar. This threat combines legitimate concerns about the ...
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Could controversial gene-editing scientist He Jiankui face the death penalty in China?

The Chinese scientist who created the world’s first genetically edited babies is living under armed guard and could face the ...
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Unapproved stem cell treatments draw FDA investigation following bacterial infections

This year [2018], 12 people have been hospitalized with bacterial infections after being treated with stem cell products derived from ...
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Paper by controversial Australian journalist retracted over ‘image manipulation’

The Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) has retracted a 2003 paper that resulted from the PhD thesis of Maryanne Demasi, an ...
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CRISPR ‘super-soldiers?’ Why we need international gene-editing rules

Within this century, human beings will be capable of changing their genes to modify traits like intelligence, or even instincts ...
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Viewpoint: We aren’t doing enough to protect people against ‘false promises’ of unproven stem cell treatments

In an announcement of no surprise, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again officially warned a company it previously warned in ...
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Chinese scientists aren’t keeping tabs on experimental gene therapy patients, report says

Gene therapies are very much at their preliminary stages of development, so it would make sense to keep tabs on ...
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Do we really need a more potent, and more addictive, opioid?

In the midst of a national opioid crisis, how badly do we need another formidable painkiller? This vexing question has ...
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Are science and religion destined to be at ‘war’?

Religion and science are incorrectly pictured as warring belief systems ...
'Human gene-editing scandal': Should rogue scientist's work be published?

‘Human gene-editing scandal’: Should rogue scientist’s work be published?

How do you handle the data of a scientist who violates all the norms of his field? … On the one hand, you ...
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Why can’t we stop rogue scientists from engaging in dubious research?

[C]an the public control science that leaves us with permanent and unenviable consequences? Recent news suggests that the answer is ...
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Controversial treatment: Can we treat drug addiction with heroin?

As overdose deaths have broken records year after year in the U.S., a group of researchers has looked around the ...
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‘Tribe before truth’: Why scientific knowledge without curiosity can be polarizing

What intellectual capacities—or if one prefers, cognitive virtues—should the citizens of a modern democratic society possess? For decades, one dominant ...
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CRISPR represents potential for huge change. But will the public trust it?

The charged language around the recent gene-editing controversy is driving an inaccurate assessment of risks ...
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Why the CDC’s opioid guidelines may be hurting patients in pain

Since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published its guideline for prescribing opioids for chronic pain in March 2016, pain patients ...
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NIH blocks research using fetal tissue, prompting calls of ‘scientific censorship’

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have been ordered not to acquire new fetal tissue for their research since ...
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‘Less expected’: China condemns research yielding gene-edited babies

On Nov. 26, U.S.-trained, Shenzhen-based He Jiankui announced that he’d altered the genes of a human embryo to create the ...
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Should law enforcement have a universal genetic forensic database?

The idea of the government having access to every citizen’s DNA might sound like an Orwellian nightmare, but recent events suggest we’re ...
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CRISPR treatment for rare genetic eye disorder gains FDA study approval

Days after a Chinese researcher incensed the world of science with claims of editing the genomes of twin girls, an American ...
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Why you could be genetically programmed to respond to placebos

Confounding drug research, some people appear genetically programmed to believe the placebo they take during drug trials actually works ...
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How Russian ‘disinformation’ could threaten our biosecurity

In a series of increasingly confrontational statements, Russia has suggested that the Pentagon is establishing a chain of bio-weapons labs ...
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What the CRISPR babies can teach us about the failings of ethical oversight

This isn't just about process, about ethical boxes left unchecked ...
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Controversial Chinese scientist behind CRISPR babies is missing

The current whereabouts of He Jiankui—the scientist who claims to have engineered the world’s first genetically modified human babies—is unknown ...
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Genetically modified humans? Here’s why they already exist

It felt as if humanity had crossed an important line: In China, a scientist named He Jiankui announced on Monday ...