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crispr

Brave new world? Why the public might actually be ready for gene-edited babies

Gene-editing tools like CRISPR/Cas9 are rapidly bringing the possibilities forward ...
bandage

‘Reprogramming’ skin cells to treat chronic wounds

By reprogramming wounded cells to a 'stem-cell-like' stage could help treat chronic sores ...
Giraffes ZN

Genes and giraffes: What do those spots tell us?

Giraffes' spotty exterior provides more than camouflage ...
gene drive

Viewpoint: UN should reject a proposed ban on gene drives

A draft resolution would revise the U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity to call on governments to "refrain from" releasing organisms containing engineered ...
trans

As arguments rage over the sources of transgender identity, science weighs in

Discussing gender dysphoria and brain differences in transgender populations ...
scream b

Emotions and memory: How your genes impact the way you see and feel the world

How much of our emotion is conjured up by an experience seems to be partly related to our genes. Could it ...
moquito

Let’s say we can force the mosquito into extinction — should we do it?

Not many people like mosquitoes. So why not eliminate them? Newer techniques like CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing may make this possible ...
genes

Should parents be allowed to use gene editing to determine the sexual orientation of their children?

Where do our sexual preferences come from? Most of us don’t stop to ponder, simply because there’s no need to ...
marijuana

Why marijuana might not be such a great weapon to fight opioid addiction

The opioid crisis is an ongoing national tragedy. One commonly suggested response is cannabis. But emerging state and national statistics ...
sciencereligion

How religious beliefs shape our thinking on cloning, stem cells and gene editing

Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam react to new technologies and concepts in their own way – though there is ...
brca png

BRCA mutations can be deadly or harmless. Now CRISPR can tell the difference

CRISPR has many emerging applications, one of which is identifying dangerous breast cancer mutations ...
cell

Blasting rodents with cell phone radiation increased cancer risk. Here’s why that means nothing for humans

Last week the National Toxicology Program (NTP) issued an update on the results of the largest animal experiment to assess ...
diabetes

Genetics and Type 2 diabetes: Why weight loss alone may not be enough for some people

People who develop Type 2 diabetes fall into one of two categories — those whose blood sugar can be controlled ...
RNA therapy

Why you need to know about RNA therapy and its potential to revolutionize disease treatment

After a decade of painstaking progress​, the underdog is on the brink of treating a broad range of diseases ...
humulin

Quick FDA approval of GMO human insulin 36 years ago contrasts with today’s biotechnology regulatory sclerosis

This week marked the 36th anniversary of one of biotechnology’s most significant milestones—the approval by the FDA of human insulin ...
fda

Who benefits most from FDA’s ‘accelerated’ drug approvals? Patients or drugmakers?

Increasing reliance on this and other means of moving drugs quickly to market have many critics worried, given that drugmakers ...
mad scientists

Not-so-mad scientists and why they’re making human body parts

Halloween brings a cornucopia of candy body parts, so it’s a good time to review recent advances in organoid technology ...
frank

How Frankenstein and 200 years of horror stories have haunted the biotechnology revolution

It was a dark and stormy night in 1818, when something sinister was loosed upon the world. Okay, so it ...
lizard

Not so different after all: Reptile and human brains have a lot in common

Reports of human and reptile brain differences seem greatly exaggerated, according to recent neuroscience ...
Screen Shot at PM

Why ending muscle wasting matters for curing cancer

Deterioration of muscle is the cause of death in many diseases, like cancer, but no treatments address this lethal symptom ...
ai

‘Autonomous weapons’ based on artificial intelligence could change warfare—and why that’s worrisome

In a new book, an expert (and former U.S. Army Ranger) warns that the world is stumbling toward a scary ...
genetic

Selling yourself? These companies want to pay for your genetic information

Some companies want to rent your DNA - should you let them? ...
vault

Why we may need a ‘Noah’s Ark’ of microbes to protect our health in the future

Preserving human microbiomes today, especially the more diverse ones from traditional peoples in developing nations, may provide treatments for diseases ...
biracial

Failure of race-based medicine? We aren’t accounting for the unique genetics of biracial and multiracial populations

For several decades in modern medicine history, human race has been used as a constant variable to predict and/or determine ...
smoking

Cancer and genetics: Why smoking threatens more than just your lungs

Cigarettes smoking causes lung, throat and larynx cancers–which makes sense because those tissues come directly into contact with smoke and ...
sugar

Breaking the body’s ‘sugar code’ could refine our ability to predict, treat diseases

Key elements of arthritis, cancer, food allergies and aging are trapped within glycans, types of sugar in the human body ...
mosquitoanddna

Synthetic biology mosquitoes: Pioneering solution emerges to counter fears over using genetic engineering to control Zika

In fall 2015, the biotech company Oxitec planned to release genetically engineered mosquitoes throughout the Florida Keys capable of stopping their ...
american melting pot

Sen. Elizabeth Warren controversy: Almost every American has a sliver of Native American ancestry

The reporting on the largest genetic study of American ancestry—claims that Americans are a genetic melting pot of white, black ...