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Does talcum baby powder cause ovarian cancer?

| | August 28, 2017
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This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

Some people may sprinkle on powder after showering and never think much of it. But recent court cases have shined a spotlight on the possible link between women’s regular use of talcum powder on their genitals and an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.

[August 21] a jury in Los Angeles ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a record $417 million to a woman who claims that the company’s baby powder led to her ovarian cancer.

The scientific evidence for a link between women’s use of talcum powder and ovarian cancer is not that strong, said Dr. Sarah Temkin, an associate professor of gynecological oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. Two newer prospective studies have failed to show any difference in ovarian cancer risk between women who used talc on their genitals and those who never did so, she said.

She said she does not think the evidence is strong enough to warrant forcing manufacturers to place a warning label on talcum powder to alert women to a possible health risk from using the product.

If an association between talc use and ovarian cancer risk exists, it is very small, Temkin said.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Does Talcum Powder Cause Ovarian Cancer?

 

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