Pesticides and food: It’s not a black and white issue

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Viewpoint: Dicamba pesticide mess already haunting Bayer’s takeover of Monsanto

| | July 3, 2018

It’s happening again. In states from Mississippi to Indiana, some US soybean farmers are seeing a troubling sight: Previously healthy plants begin to look wan, their leaves puckering into a cup-like shape. Similar symptoms are hitting trees, ornamental and garden plants, flowers, berries, and vegetables.

If the story sounds familiar, that’s because cupped leaves and the angry farmers who tend them are emerging as a recurring summer saga in the Heartland as swaths of land are exposed to errant mists of the potent herbicide dicamba. The pesticide is marketed by Monsanto, the erstwhile US seed/pesticide giant which will soon be subsumed into German chemical behemoth Bayer. And as Bayer integrates Monsanto, it’s also inheriting the smaller company’s dicamba mess.

Like last year, the company appears to be on a collision course with independent scientists over its blockbuster pesticide. And now it’s Bayer, a chemical company most famous in the United States for its aspirin, that will inherit the headache. For dicamba-using farmers and their neighbors, 2018 is shaping up to be yet another long, hot summer.

Read full, original article: Bayer Bought Monsanto and Is Now Stuck With Its Biggest Headache

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

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