New genome sequencing technique produces its first genetically-screened IVF baby

David Levy and Marybeth S guardian
David Levy and Marybeth Scheidts holding their baby Connor Levy. Image via Guardian.

The first IVF baby to be screened using a procedure that can read every letter of the human genome has been born in the US.

The birth demonstrates how next-generation sequencing (NGS), which was developed to read whole genomes quickly and cheaply, is poised to transform the selection of embryos in IVF clinics. Though scientists only looked at chromosomes – the structures that hold genes – on this occasion, the falling cost of whole genome sequencing means doctors could soon read all the DNA of IVF embryos before choosing which to implant in the mother.

Read the full article here: IVF baby born using revolutionary genetic-screening process

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