How do cystic fibrosis bacteria evolve to thrive in human lungs?

The bacterium that’s the most important pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has genetically evolved and adapted to survive in CF-infected lungs and evade antibiotic treatments, scientists from the University of Ottawa and the University of Calgary have shown.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is called an “opportunistic pathogen.” While the micro-organism is widespread in the environment and is harmless to healthy people, it infects those who are ill or have compromised immune systems.
The team of scientists performed the first systematic analysis of entire genomes (the full genetic “blueprint”) for multiple “epidemic and nonepidemic” strains of P. aeruginosa.

Their analysis showed that the main drivers for the evolution and adaptation of the bacterium are the CF-lung environment itself and the presence of antibiotics.

Read the full, original story here: Cystic Fibrosis Bacteria Genetically Evolves to Live in Lungs, Evade Antibiotic Treatments

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