GMOs matter most where climate change and population growth are challenges

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The question of how we produce food, as the global population heads for nine billion in 2050, must be addressed. It certainly occupies our leading plant geneticists. But in public, the argument is all heat and no light; most of us seem inclined to go for what seems little more than superstition. We seem incapable of calculating risk versus overall good in food, submitting instead to a form of hysteria. SUGAR!! Waaaaah. Bread! Nooooooo. What hope is there for advancing our know-ledge of genetically modified crops?

What we need in the GM debate is a Baroness Ashton, someone with invisible powers of negotiation who stirs up no emotions.

Read the full, original article: Sarah Sands: The science of GM food is king over ideology

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