Epigenetic changes up your cancer risk as you age

Researchers from the NIH say they have demonstrated that a subset of human genomic sites that become increasingly methylated with advancing age are also disproportionately methylated in a variety of human cancers. Their findings (“Genome-wide age-related DNA methylation changes in blood and other tissues relate to histone modification, expression and cancer”) are published in Carcinogenesis.

“You can think of methylation as dust settling on an unused switch, which then prevents the cell from turning on certain genes,” said Jack Taylor, M.D., Ph.D., from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. “If a cell can no longer turn on critical developmental programs, it might be easier for it to become a cancer cell.”

Read the full, original story: Age-Related Epigenetic Changes Up the Cancer Risk

Outbreak
Outbreak Daily Digest
Biotech Facts & Fallacies
Genetics Unzipped
Infographic: How dangerous COVID mutant strains develop

Infographic: How dangerous COVID mutant strains develop

Sometime in 2019, probably in China, SARS CoV-2 figured out a way to interact with a specific "spike" on the ...
Untitled

Philip Njemanze: Leading African anti-GMO activist claims Gates Foundation destroying Nigeria

Nigerian anti-GMO activist, physician, and inventor pushes anti-gay and anti-GMO ...
News on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

Optional. Mail on special occasions.
Send this to a friend