Plants have sex, and many even have sex chromosomes

Plants have sex? Yes, they totally do.

Plants have female reproductive organs (carpels) and male reproductive organs (stamens), but several different ways of determining sex. There are two main groups of seed-producing plants.

Gymnosperms are plants without covered seeds, and include those that produce cones. Gymnosperms and are split with about 75 percent exhibiting monoecy (having male and female sex organs on the same plant), and 25 percent exhibiting dioecy (having separate male plants and female plants).

Alternatively,  Angiosperms, the flowering plants, have only a small subgroup that exhibit either separate male and female flowers or separate male and female plants, and instead most angiosperms are hermaphrodites, meaning all of their flowers contain both male and female sex organs.

One thing that is fairly common among vertebrates (found in mammals, birds, frogs, reptiles, and fish), but rare among plants is sex chromosomes. But, as we look more and more, we are finding sex chromosomes in the most delicious places.

Read full, original article: Delicious sex chromosomes.

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