Another paper by Italian research team raising GMO safety concerns retracted

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A researcher who published findings questioning the safety of genetically modified organisms has lost a second paper following concerns of image manipulation.

Last week, the journal animal retracted a 2010 paper by Federico Infascelli, an animal nutrition researcher at the University of Naples, which claimed to find modified genes in the milk and blood of goats who were fed genetically modified soybeans. The retraction stems from an investigation that concluded the authors likely manipulated images, according to the note. Earlier this year, another journal retracted one of Infascelli’s papers that contained a duplicated figure.

In February, Italian paper La Repubblica (which we read with Google Translate) reported that the university found problems in three of his articles and issued a warning.

Here’s the retraction note for “Fate of transgenic DNA and evaluation of metabolic effects in goats fed genetically modified soybean and in their offsprings:”

. . .we received several expressions of concern from third parties that the electrophoresis gels presented might have been subject to unwarranted digital manipulations . . . A detailed independent investigation . . . included an analysis of the claims using the figures as submitted. . . The authors were notified of our concerns and asked to account for the observed irregularities. In the absence of a satisfactory explanation, the institution was asked to investigate further. The University of Naples concluded that multiple heterogeneities were likely attributable to digital manipulation, raising serious doubts on the reliability of the findings.

The 2010 paper has been cited 19 times, according to Thomson Reuters Web of Science.

Read full, original post: Another paper by GM researcher pulled over manipulation concerns

  • Larkin Curtis Hannah

    Such a surprise. But more importantly, it will be interesting and informative to see if Serelini still has a job at the University of Naples.