Will consumers accept CRISPR gene edited non-browning mushrooms?

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Marketers say the idea of a non-browning mushroom developed through gene-editing techniques is intriguing, although few seem to know if consumers will accept the idea.

Penn State University professor Yinong Yang developed the anti-browning mushroom using a gene-editing tool called CRISPR.

Eventually, CRISPR technology could be used to bring fruits, vegetables and other crops to the market with improvements aimed at growers and consumers, researchers say.

“The consumer will decide,” said Bill St. John, sales director of Gonzales, Texas-based Kitchen Pride Mushroom Farms Inc.

“Especially white mushrooms have an especially short shelf life — the browning kind of turns people away,” he said.

“With the product looking better longer, it could help both retailers and consumers,” he said.

Whether that translates to more demand remains to be seen, St. John said.

“This mushroom will be looked on by consumers as a GMO item even though the CRISPR technology does not introduce genetic material taken from a different organism as does the traditional method of gene splicing/replacement,” said [Vince Versagli, sales director with Kennett Square, Pa.-based South Mill Mushroom Sales and Kaolin Mushroom Farms Inc.]

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Feelings mixed on gene-edited mushroom

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