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US producers struggling to keep up with rising demand for organic, non-GMO grains

| February 20, 2017

Increasing consumer demand for organic and non-GMO foods led to a sharp rise in organic grain imports in 2016 — prompting food manufacturers to explore new incentives for U.S. growers transitioning to organic production, according to a new report from CoBank.

While U.S. production of non-GMO crops has risen, domestic production of organic corn and soybeans remains well short of demand.

Imports of organic grains, particularly corn, from countries such as India, Ukraine, Romania and Turkey surged in 2016 to meet the burgeoning U.S. demand for organic food products.

Organic corn imports more than doubled from 2015 to 2016 and accounted for nearly one-half of the U.S. organic corn supply.

The domestic shortfall for organic soybeans was even greater, with roughly 80 percent of soybeans supplying the U.S. organic market imported in 2016.

Animal feed for organically raised dairy, beef, pork and poultry products and ingredients used in organic consumer packaged goods are the two principal markets for organically produced grains.

For U.S. farmers to satisfy this growing appetite for organic foods, analysts estimate between one and five million U.S. acres would have to be transitioned to organic production.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: CoBank Report Shows Rising Demand For Organic and Non-GMO Grains Outpaces U.S. Production 

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.
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