Viewpoint: What happened to Russian ‘Factor GMO’ study—and why aren’t journalists covering it?

| | April 4, 2018

In late 2014, with fanfare and a multi-lingual press conference, a group centered in Russia hacked the food media with claims about a huge experiment that they were running. Factor GMO, “The world’s largest international study on GMO safety,” as their press release stated, was launched. Coordinated by activist Elena Sharoykina of the NGO named “National Association for Genetic Safety (NAGS)”, they would steward this $25million project….

Though no report or data has yet seen the light of day, and news about the project has stopped, FactorGMO did seem to press on for a while, at least.

However, except for one more press release later in 2015, and a final holiday tweet at the year’s end, FactorGMO’s publicity machine had gone dark

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[W]here are the journalists? You were given clickbait by Russians that you dutifully posted and got readers, but you have not followed up at all. They used you to sow doubt. They used your logos to brag about the coverage and the publicity that they got from you. They used you to lure potential donors, presumably. Why aren’t you following up on this possible science con? Why is there no accountability?

Read full, original post: FactorGMO: Science Vaporware, from Russia, with a Bad Smell

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Click the link above to read the full, original article.

2 thoughts on “Viewpoint: What happened to Russian ‘Factor GMO’ study—and why aren’t journalists covering it?”

  1. I have to say what surprises me the most is that the true believers of this project–people who gave them money–don’t seem to have noticed that their donations have evaporated.

    • I think this is a much-ignored effect of emotional investment.

      When people donate to something, it can make them very determined to ignore problems and issues with the recipient of their donation and to argue that cause in the face of countervailing evidence.

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