But the FDA announced that they view CRISPR in animals as a form of gene therapy, which means it’s regulated as a veterinary drug. So if you want to use CRISPR to produce a hornless cow, or a purebred dog that’s missing one of the harmful mutations that often come along with inbreeding, you would have to go through the extremely expensive process of getting it approved as a new drug.

Bottom line: CRISPR plants could be in a grocery store near you in a few years, but CRISPR-edited animals face more barriers.

Read full, original post: What Is CRISPR and What Can It Really Do?