Glyphosate on trial: Second jury says Bayer’s Roundup weed killer carcinogenic

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Plaintiff Edwin Hardeman, right, with his wife Mary. Image: Jeff Chiu/AP

A US jury has found that one of the world’s most widely-used weedkillers was a “substantial factor” in causing a man’s cancer. Pharmaceutical group Bayer had strongly rejected claims that its glyphosate-based Roundup product was carcinogenic.

But the jury in San Francisco ruled unanimously that it contributed to causing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in California resident Edwin Hardeman. The next stage of the trial will consider Bayer’s liability and damages. During this phase, which starts on [March 20], Mr Hardeman’s lawyers are expected to present evidence allegedly showing Bayer’s efforts to influence scientists, regulators and the public about the safety of its products.

[Editor’s note: Read the GLP’s FAQ Is glyphosate (Roundup) dangerous? for a detailed discussion of glyphosate safety.]

Related article:  Glyphosate, cancer confusion: Explaining WHO's contradicting reports

“We are confident the evidence in phase two will show that Monsanto’s conduct has been appropriate and the company should not be liable for Mr. Hardeman’s cancer,” [Bayer] said. Bayer continues “to believe firmly that science confirms that glyphosate-based herbicides do not cause cancer.”

Another Roundup trial is scheduled to begin in California state court in Oakland on 28 March, involving a couple who claim Roundup caused their non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Read full, original article: Weedkiller glyphosate a ‘substantial’ cancer factor

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