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Viewpoint: Prenatal DNA intelligence predictors ignore environment’s role in IQ

| | August 26, 2019

When we examine the way DNA IQ predictors are generated, we see scientists grouping people with similar IQ test results and academic achievements, and then searching for the DNA those people have in common. But there’s a lot more to scores and achievements than meets the eye. Good nutrition, support at home, and access to healthcare and education make a huge difference in how people do. Therefore, the first problem with using DNA IQ predictors is that the data points themselves may be compromised by numerous inaccuracies.

We must then ask ourselves where the deep, enduring inequities in our society are really coming from. A deluge of research has shown that poor life outcomes are a product of social inequalities, like toxic living conditions, underfunded schools, and unhealthy jobs. A wealth of research has also shown that race, gender, sexuality, and class heavily influence life outcomes in numerous ways. Parents and caregivers feed, talk, and play differently with babies of different genders. Teachers treat girls and boys [differently].

It is time that we shift our priorities from seeking genetic causes to fixing the social causes we know to be real.

Read full, original post: DNA Tests for Intelligence Ignore the Real Reasons Why Kids Succeed or Fail

Related article:  Measuring intelligence and IQ, and the problems that presents
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