‘Genome doping’: Gene-edited babies could change the world of athletics

murray gene doping olympics tease now q
Image: Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast

With the taboo on human gene editing in the process of being shattered, children whose genomes have been modified before birth in order to give them a competitive advantage later in life could be born in the next few years. Some of these individuals could conceivably be of age to compete in the 2040 Olympics.

When combined with the growing attention being paid to genetics in sports, as we argue in a new paper published in the the Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Journal, the hype and allure of embryonic gene editing is likely to create serious political and economic temptations for countries and/or parents to start “genome doping.”

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It will be unfathomably expensive initially, but there are very wealthy people who want to see their children succeed in competitive sports. And for decades, international sporting events have been a place where athletes and their countries and coaches have used cutting-edge science and technology in search of getting ahead of the pack.

With no clear legal or ethical pathways forward, society is ill-prepared for the very real possibility of genome doping in athletes.

Read full, original post: We Are Not Ready to Deal With Gene-Edited Athletes

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