Sustainability bonus: Boll worm resistant cotton eliminates pesticide use

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The following is an edited excerpt.

Thanks to the genetic trait in our cotton that makes it resistant to the boll worm, we did not spray one drop of insecticide on our fields this year.  Not one drop.

Because we don’t have to spray for the boll worm any longer, the beneficial insects are flourishing and naturally control the other minor pests.  Now, if we planted non-GMO cotton, like the farmers in Brazil that Daniel met last spring, we might have to spray our cotton up to 13 times with insecticide.  That’s what the Brazilian farmers told him they have to do in order to save their non-GMO cotton crop.  Once they start spraying for the boll worm, then they have to spray for other pests because the beneficials are gone. 13 applications verses 0 applications.

In my book, there is no comparison.

Read the original article in its entirety here: Kiss the Boll Worm Goodbye!

 

Outbreak Featured
Infographics: Key charts illustrate split between vaccinated and unvaccinated America

Infographics: Key charts illustrate split between vaccinated and unvaccinated America

Three in 10 American adults remain unvaccinated, according to the latest survey from the KFF. But they’re not a monolith ...
Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

Are GMOs and pesticides threatening bees?

First introduced in 1995, neonicotinoids ...
glp menu logo outlined

Newsletter Subscription

* indicates required
Email Lists
glp menu logo outlined

Get news on human & agricultural genetics and biotechnology delivered to your inbox.