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Genes may dictate which microbes thrive on your body

| | October 25, 2013

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Scouring the genomes and body-wide microbial communities of 93 people, researchers have discovered a link between the composition of the microbiome and genetic variation in innate immunity, phagocyte function, and other immune pathways. The research was presented by University of Minnesota population geneticist Ran Blekhman October 24 at the American Society of Human Genetics 2013 annual meeting in Boston.

Other researchers have linked specific gene variants to alterations in the human microbiome, noted George Weinstock of The Genome Institute at Washington University, whose own work has shown that host-microbe interactions are influenced by genes involved in drug metabolism. This study, however, may well be the first genome-wide search for such variants in humans, and “genetic variation in mouse does not represent genetic variation that segregates in human populations,” Blekhman noted.

Read the full, original story here: It’s in the Genes

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