Rare genetic variant reduces heart disease risk from dietary fat

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We all know people who seem to have been born with good genes—they may smoke, never exercise, or consume large amounts of bacon, yet they remain seemingly healthy.

Now, researchers have found that individuals who carry a rare genetic mutation that controls the blood levels of certain fats, or lipids, are protected from heart disease. The result, reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics, suggests that a drug mimicking this effect could prevent heart disease, a major killer.

Read the full, original story here: Why a Lucky Few Can Eat to Their Heart’s Content

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