Microbiome imbalances may impact seasonal allergies

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When we think of allergies, we typically think of the itchy eyes and sneezing fits that are the hallmark of the onset of allergy season. But what if these allergies had more to do with the bacteria and microbes in your gut than anything going on in your head?

That’s one of the findings that appears to be emerging from the work of the Human Microbiome Project, a multi-year, $100+ million project from the National Institutes of Health that is attempting to create a map of all the microbes in and on your body. There are literally tens of trillions bacteria, viruses and microorganisms that inhabit your nasal passages, skin, oral cavities and gastrointestinal tract. The problem is, we really don’t know what all these microorganisms actually do. The growing consensus, however, is that an imbalance in your personal microbiome can lead to some allergies and even certain diseases.

Read the full, original story: The secret to treating your allergies may lie in your stomach

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