From pink pineapple to purple tomatoes, next wave of GMO foods will have health benefits

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via AP

Cancer-fighting pink pineapples, heart-healthy purple tomatoes and less fatty vegetable oils may someday be on grocery shelves alongside more traditional products.

These genetically engineered foods could receive government approval in the coming years, following the OK given recently given to apples that don’t brown and potatoes that don’t bruise.

The companies and scientists that have created these foods are hoping that customers will be attracted to the health benefits and convenience and overlook any concerns about genetic engineering.

What could be coming next? Del Monte has engineered a pink pineapple that includes lycopene, an antioxidant compound that gives tomatoes their red color and may have a role in preventing cancer. USDA has approved importation of the pineapple, which would be grown only outside of the United States; it is pending FDA approval. A small British company is planning to apply for U.S. permission to produce and sell purple tomatoes that have high levels of anthocyanins, compounds found in blueberries that some studies show lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. FDA would have to approve any health claims used to sell the products.

Facing that concern, companies developing the new products say their strategy for winning over consumers is to harness the increased interest in healthy eating.

“This is a new wave of crops that have both grower benefits and consumer benefits,” says Doug Cole of J.R. Simplot, the company that developed the potatoes. Many modified types of corn and soybeans are engineered to resist herbicides, a benefit for growers trying to control weeds but of little use for the consumer.

Read full, original article: Next-generation GMOs: Pink pineapples and purple tomatoes

  • Chance Lawrence

    Fruits and vegetables bred with traditional breeding techniques ALREADY HAVE anti-cancer and health-promoting properties. Genetic modification is in no way, shape, or form necessary; completely 100% unnecessary. Plus, can a technology get any more ego-centric, and remove us any further from our natural place in the ecosystem? Permaculture is the best solution. It is inspiring, intriguing, practical, it reconnects humans to their food and to nature, it’s cheap, efficienty, resilient, and it solves most of the world’s problems.

    • gmoeater

      Wow. Permaculture, yay! Does everything except wash my dishes. Sounds like an evangelistic religion for you. Go for it.
      I’m up for potatoes that have less cancer-producing enzymes, and corn that has less infestation from “natural,” “organic” mycotoxins left by the corn borer. And life-saving rice that has been enriched with Vitamin A. But then again, science and health are my religion. Our gods can get along as long as your god stays on your side of the fence and does not interfere with mine. What is “necessary” (or not) for you may not reflect what I, or farmers, or other consumers, believe is “necessary.”
      I don’t want evangelists knocking on my door, so thankyouverymuch, but I’m not up for your religion.

    • Farmer with a Dell

      GMO has a lot to offer the common masses, permaculture has a lot to offer the uncommon individual. So too an abundance of apples vs a rare Densuke watermelon or a fleet of buses vs a custom Lamborghini.

      GMO enhancement benefits billions regardless of economic or social standing, regardless of geography or demographics. Permaculture might benefit thousands of the sufficiently affluent, and only in select locations in privileged situations. Few of us will ever possess King Herod’s gardens for ourselves.

      If permaculture is all you say it is…and if it is for everyone, not just for well-heeled retirees and trust fund brats…it might be worth taking a look at. Got any good representative examples of established permacultures we can dissect and study? No hobby garden plots. No hypothetical delusions that always seem to squish out from under our microscope before we can get a good honest look. Let’s have a full scale mature producing permaculture with it’s beneficiary human population fully exposed for our inspection. Any objections?

      • hyperzombie

        I don’t think these folks know much about farming at all, how would rice and wheat work in permaculture well? Do you plant it with Canola, field peas, and some pumpkins. you know to give it some nice color?
        And why wouldn’t GMO crops work well in permaculture?
        So many questions, so few answers with the permaculture folk.

        • Farmer with a Dell

          Yeah, but I’ve never gotten that far along in the discussion with any of ’em. I always ask for live examples but seems like every time one of these snake oil salesmen comes around the sales pitch always goes just like this…

          • hyperzombie

            So funny!!! Link didn’t work for me but I looked it up.

    • hyperzombie

      “Fruits and vegetables bred with traditional breeding techniques ALREADY HAVE anti-cancer and health-promoting properties.”

      And why would you not want more of this? Did cancer and health problems disappear and I didn’t notice?

      “Genetic modification is in no way, shape, or form necessary; completely 100% unnecessary.”

      The wheel is 100% unnecessary, but it is sure nice to have.

      “Plus, can a technology get any more ego-centric, and remove us any further from our natural place in the ecosystem?”

      Our natural place? Hmmm, didnt nature give us the intelligence to invent agriculture and the ability to modify the genome making it 100% natural.

  • EPH

    Don’t we already have purple tomatoes?