Annoyed by loud chewing? It may be all in your brain

| | February 7, 2017

Misophonia, a disorder which means sufferers have a hatred of sounds such as eating, chewing, loud breathing or even repeated pen-clicking, was first named as a condition in 2001.

Over the years, scientists have been skeptical about whether or not it constitutes a genuine medical ailment, but now new research led by a team at the U.K.'s Newcastle University has proven that those with misophonia have a difference in their brain's frontal lobe to non-sufferers.

[S]cientists said scans of misophobia sufferers found changes in brain activity when a 'trigger' sound was heard. Brain imaging revealed that people with the condition have an abnormality in their emotional control mechanism which causes their brains to go into overdrive on hearing trigger sounds. The researchers also found that trigger sounds could evoke a heightened physiological response, with increased heart rate and sweating.

...

“For many people with misophonia, this will come as welcome news as for the first time we have demonstrated a difference in brain structure and function in sufferers," Dr Sukhbinder Kumar, from the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University.

[The study can be found here.]

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Does the Sound of Noisy Eating Drive You Mad? Here's Why

Send this to a friend