Is it possible to stop our muscles and bones from deteriorating as we age?

| June 8, 2017
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This article or excerpt is included in the GLP’s daily curated selection of ideologically diverse news, opinion and analysis of biotechnology innovation.

With age, the form and function of our bones and muscles drop off, putting us as increased risk for frailty and falls.

Now researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University are dissecting just what happens to the stem cells that make the tissues, which help keep us upright, with an eye on improving our healthspan.

Time seems to alter the dynamic between the mesenchymal stem cells making bone and muscle and the amino acids that fuel them…[In other words,] our stem cell population gets reduced and the cells we have become less efficient at making bone and muscle, often opting for the easier task of making fat instead….

A major culprit in their breakdown appears to be the metabolite kynurenine, a byproduct of the essential amino acid tryptophan. Tryptophan is among the nine amino acids our body can’t make and we must consume in foods like turkey and soybeans…The researchers also think the fuel sends signals to cells, ones that aging stem cells apparently don’t get.

The GLP aggregated and excerpted this blog/article to reflect the diversity of news, opinion, and analysis. Read full, original post: Major research initiative explores how our bones and muscles age, new ways to block their decline

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